Conferences & Call for Papers 2016

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Call for papers  and Conferences 2016

Society for Classical Studies, in Toronto from January 5-8, 2017.Panel: From Plants to Planets: Human and Nonhuman Relations in Ancient Medicine

Sponsored by the Society for Ancient Medicine and Pharmacy (SAM). SAM is an affiliated group of the Society for Classical Studies.

One of the most important tenets in ancient Greco-Roman medicine, from the early Hippocratic texts down into late antiquity, is the situation of the human body within a vast network of non-human bodies and forces.  The use of nonhuman materials for therapeutic purposes obviously predates the earliest records of naturalizing medicine, but with the rise of the inquiry into nature in the classical era, plants, animals, and even non-human objects (e.g., clay vessels) become newly important as bodies analogous to the human while remaining crucial as therapeutic resources; and larger-scale analogies between microcosm and macrocosm recur across the corpus of medical texts.  From the Hellenistic period onwards, the circulation of sympathies and antipathies in the terrestrial and astral worlds, implicit or explicit, creates complex networks of affinity and enmity between humans, plants, animals, stones, and planetary bodies.  The development of systematic anatomical research, after a brief foray into the human body, relies for the most part on animal bodies, most notably in Galen.

The interaction of human and nonhuman worlds is basic knowledge to scholars of ancient medicine.  But how can our understanding of these dense networks of force and meaning be advanced by recent perspectives on the nonhuman, actor-network theory, the environmental and medical humanities, multispecies ethnography, medical anthropology, new materialisms, animal studies, and related fields across the humanities and social sciences?  What light can a renewed focus on human and non-human relations in ancient medicine shed on our conceptualization of the social self and forms of community in the ancient world more generally?  How might they be read together with recent work on other forms of interpersonal sociality and power in ancient medicine?  Or do ancient medical texts more often inscribe a tacit division between subjects and objects within the cosmos?

Accepted papers will be presented at a SAM panel at the SCS at the 2017 meeting, which will be held January 5-8, 2017 in Toronto, Ontario. Panelists must be membwers of the SCS at the time of presentation.

Please send an abstract of 500 words of your proposed paper (20 min.) by e-mail to Brooke Holmes ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). The abstract should omit any reference identifying the author to ensure anonymity in the review process.  Deadline for submission of abstracts is March 1, 2016.

Where Does it Hurt? Ancient Medicine in Questions and Answers. Conference, Leuven 30-31 August 2016

Asking the right questions and obtaining the right answers is vital to modern medical healthcare. It is essential for efficient doctor-patient communication, forming an important component of medical treatment. This was no different in Antiquity. Already the Hippocratic writings give us an idea of which kinds of questions physicians asked in diagnosing their patients, and which answers they received in return (see, e.g., the case histories in the Epidemics). However, one can imagine that patients or, in case of severe illness, their relatives were often incapable of providing an accurate answer to (some of) the doctor’s questions. Galen, for instance, says that certain types of pain are actually felt by patients, but cannot be described by them when asked to (Loc. Aff. 2, 9 [8, 117 Kühn]). As such, a good doctor had to be able not simply to ask the right questions, but also to look for the right answers himself, if necessary.

The use of question-and-answer (Q&A) formulas is widely attested in ancient medical literature. By employing specific interrogative turns in their discourses, medical authors not only sought to provide practical information for proper treatment of patients, but also to amass theoretical insights about the human body and its physiological and pathological processes more generally. They dealt with several types of questions, including questions that sought to locate, define and explain certain illnesses or disorders in the body (“Where does it hurt?”, “What is it that hurts?”, ”Why does it hurt?”). Questions of this kind were common in medical treatises of the Greco-Roman period (they can be found, e.g., in medical manuals, medical papyri and collections of problemata). The popularity of the Q&A format is largely due to the fact that it became well-entrenched in the ancient medical school curriculum. Through its dialogical and interrogative structure, it provided teachers and students with a useful method to question and memorize all types of medical knowledge, both practical and theoretical. Once condensed in a textual form, it was also useful in transferring this knowledge between author and reader.

This conference aims to bring together scholars from the field of medical history and related fields (history of science, [natural] philosophy, theology, literary studies, linguistics, ...) with the goal of examining the role of Q&A in medical literature, from the Hippocratic writers to Late Antiquity and its reception in the Middle Ages. The conference is open to various approaches, and aims to address – but is not restricted to – questions of content (e.g., transfer and transformation of medical knowledge in Q&A style), textuality (e.g., development from orality to written text), context (e.g., socio-intellectual relations between doctor/patient, teacher/student, author/reader), and use (e.g., theoretical contemplation vs. practical application of medical knowledge).

Please send your abstract (ca. 500 words) and a short bio (ca. 10 lines) by 15 January 2016 to Erika Gielen ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) and Michiel Meeusen ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). Presentations should be 20 minutes in length. In your abstract, please include a clear summary of your argument and an indication of how your paper would contribute to critical reflection on the topic as a whole. Early career researchers are especially encouraged to send in an abstract. The organisers hope, but cannot promise, to be able to offer accommodation to speakers.

 

Call for Papers: Greek and Roman Military Manuals: Genre, Theory, Influence:

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, 21 & 22 October 2016

 

While scholars acknowledge the ubiquity of military manuals in antiquity, systematic study of this genre has yet to be undertaken.  To be sure, military manuals are enigmatic and at the same time intrinsically fascinating texts.  This workshop seeks to provide a forum for scholars to reflect upon ancient Greek and Roman military manuals as a genre, with a view to exploring and demonstrating their utility in ancient historical research.  Moreover, military manuals ought to be seen not as existing entirely as a separate genre, as has been largely the case heretofore, but rather as texts deliberately constructed to engage with other genres in which warfare plays a central role (for example, epic poetry and historical narrative). Abstracts for papers of approximately 30 minutes (to be followed by 15 minutes of discussion) are invited.  Proposals for papers on Byzantine and Mediaeval military manuals are also welcome.

Interested participants are invited to contact the workshop organisers: James T. Chlup ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) and Conor Whately ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ).  The organisers ask that proposals be submitted no later than 31 January 2016.

 

 

Certissima signa. A Venice Conference on Greek and Latin Astronomical Texts organised by Filippomaria Pontani e Anna Santoni
Venice, June 16th-17th 2016, Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana, Vestibolo, Piazzetta San Marco n. 13/a
 

 

June 16th, 2016
13.45 Maurizio Messina (direttore Bibl. Naz. Marciana), Indirizzo di saluto
14.00 Susy Marcon - Elisabetta Sciarra (Venezia), Astronomica Marciana
session I
14.40 Klaus Geus (Berlin), Astronomy and Geography. Some unexplored connections
15.10 Jordi Pamias (Barcelona), Mitos catasterísmicos en la tradición no eratosténica
15.40 Anne Weddigen (Reims/Paris), Le diagramme astronomique dans la tradition manuscrite des Harmoniques de Manuel Bryenne
session II
16.40 Arnaud Zucker (Nice), Astronomical relevancy of illuminated constellations in medieval manuscripts of Hyginus’ Astronomy
17.10 Alena Hadravova (Prag), Star myths in the so-called Vatican Mythographers I–III
17.40 Petr Hadrava - Alena Hadravova (Prag), Cristannus de Prachaticz's  treatises on the astrolabe:a computer method for the preparation of critical editions and statistical treatment of variant readings in the apparatus
June 17th, 2016
session III
9.00 Anna Santoni (Pisa), De signis coeli and De ordine ac positione
stellarum in signis: two star catalogues from the Carolingian Age. Analogies and differences
9.30 Fabio Guidetti (Berlin), Texts and illustrations in Venice, Biblioteca
Nazionale Marciana, ms. VIII 22
10.00 Francesco Bertola (Padova), Astronomical Tubes

session IV
11.30 K. Lippincott (London), Hyginus, Michael Scot and the tyranny of technology in the early Renaissance
12.00 Elisabetta Lugato - Filippomaria Pontani (Venezia), On Aldus' Scriptores astronomici
12.40 Davide Baldi (Firenze), Gli auctores antichi nella Cosmographiae introductio (1507) di M. Ringmann - M. Waldseemueller

 

 

For further information please email:    This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

ARCHIVE: Call for papers  and Conferences 2015

 

The Hippocratic Corpus and its Commentators: East and West, 28–30 October 2015, University of Manchester   

The fifteenth Colloque Hippocratique will take place in Manchester from the 28th to the 30th of October 2015. It continues a long tradition of colloquia, initiated in 1972 in Strasbourg by Louis Bourgey and Jacques Jouanna. This series of scholarly encounters has firmly established Hippocratic studies as an independent field of scholarship and produced some of the most important work in this area over the last four decades. The theme of the fifteenth Colloque Hippocratique is the vast commentary tradition that engaged with various writings within the Hippocratic Corpus. The colloquium is organised around five sessions, arranged roughly chronologically: early commentaries; Galen; late antiquity; the Middle Ages (Latin, Arabic and Hebrew); the Renaissance and the early modern period


We ask those interested in attending to please email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

David Langslow, Professor of Classics Dept of Classics & Ancient History, University of Manchester

 

 

Pseudo-Galenic Texts and the Formation of the Galenic Corpus

 

An international conference at the Warburg Institute, London 14-15 May 2015 organised by: Dr. Caroline Petit, University of Warwick

 

A programme for "Pseudo-Galenic texts and the Formation of the Galenic corpus" at the Warburg Institute is now availablehttp://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/colloquia-2014-15/pseudo-galenic-texts/ 

The conference is free of charge. For registration please contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


The ‘Arabic Commentaries on the Hippocratic Aphorisms’ Project will hold a conference on the 9-11 April 2015.

The Project investigates the rich tradition of Arabic interaction with this particular medical text (as outlined below), and the conference will tackle a range of themes, to be addressed in five panels. The conference will take place in Alan Turing Building, Room G107, beginning at 9am on Thur 9 April. Please direct any enquiries to the project’s research administrator, Dr Steven Spiegl, at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or to Dr Kamran Karimullah at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

IIIe Séminaire doctoral “Littératures techniques et tradition des textes scientifiques de l’Antiquité gréco-romaine” (Université de Reims - Casa de Velázquez), Madrid, 20-24 avril 2015.

Du 20 au 24 avril 2015, l’Université de Reims et la Casa de Velázquez de Madrid s’associeront pour la troisième édition du séminaire doctoral Littératures techniques et tradition des textes scientifiques de l'Antiquité gréco-romaine, organisé depuis 2012 en partenariat avec l’Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes (IRHT, CNRS).

Interviendront Pascal Arnaud, Klaus Geus, Francisco Javier Gómez Espelosín, Francisco Beltrán Lloris, Irene Pajón Leyra, Inmaculada Pérez Martín, Rosario Pintaudi, Francesco Prontera, Anne Tihon, Arnaud Zucker.

Quatorze bourses seront attribuées sur candidature à des doctorants et étudiants de master2 désirant suivre le séminaire.

Organisation scientifique: Didier Marcotte, Université de Reims.

http://median.hypotheses.org/ https://www.casadevelazquez.org/

 

 

Call for Papers The fifteenth Colloque Hippocratique will take place in Manchester from 28–30 October 2015.

It continues a long tradition of colloquia, initiated originally in Strasburg in 1972 by Louis Bourgey and Jacques Jouanna. This series of scholarly encounters has firmly established Hippocratic studies as an independent field of scholarship and produced some of the most important work in this area over the last three decades.
We now invite submissions from scholars active in the area of Hippocratic studies. The theme of this, the fifteenth reiteration of the Colloque Hippocratique, will be the vast commentary tradition that engaged with various writings within the Hippocratic Corpus. Galen is, of course, the best known author, many of whose commentaries have come down to us not only in the original Greek, but also in Arabic, Latin, and Syriac translations. But many other Greek doctors explained and interpreted the various Hippocratic texts, be it in the first-century Asia Minor (e.g., Rufus of Ephesus) or sixth- and seventh-century Alexandria (e.g., the elusive John and Stephen of Alexandria). Some commentaries only survive in Latin, Syriac, Arabic, or Hebrew translations, so that the secondary transmission of these works acquires tremendous importance. During the medieval and early modern period, physicians continued to write commentaries in Latin, Arabic and Hebrew, with the Aphorisms attracting the greatest exegetical attention.

The colloque will centre around five sessions, arranged roughly chronologically:

- Early commentaries
- Galen
- Late-Antique Alexandria
- Middle Ages (Latin, Arabic and Hebrew)
- Renaissance and early modern period
The aim is to cover the whole commentary tradition on the Hippocratic Corpus, which flourished well into the eighteenth century and beyond.
We ask those interested in delivering papers to submit titles and short abstracts (up to 200 words) to 
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it <mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it > by 15 February 2015. Papers can be presented in any of the main European languages, although the proceedings will be published in English. The papers and subsequent questions should last no more than thirty minutes.
Steven Spiegl (on behalf of Professor Peter Pormann)

Dr Steven Spiegl  l  WLG13  l  Samuel Alexander Bldg  l  Classics & Ancient History Dept.  l  The University of Manchester  l  Manchester  l  M13 9PL  l  Tel +44 (0)161 275 0474/+44 (0)161 306 5516  l  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it